sport injuries

Smitty's Plan for O​rthopedic Rehabilitation & Training

Most sports injuries are due to either trauma or overuse of muscles or joints. The majority are caused by minor trauma involving muscles, ligaments, tendons, or bones, including:

  • Contusions (bruises)
  • Sprains
  • Strains
  • Fractures
  • Dislocations


What is a contusion?
A contusion (bruise) is an injury to the soft tissue. It is often caused by blunt force such as a kick, fall, or blow. The immediate result will be pain, swelling, and discoloration.

What is a sprain? 
A sprain is a stretch or tear of a ligament. Ligaments are flexible bands of fibrous tissue that connect bones to bones, and bones to cartilage. They also hold together the bones in your joints. Sprains often affect the ankles, knees, or wrists.

What is a strain?
A strain is twisting, pull or tear of a muscle or tendon, and is often caused by overuse, force, or stretching. A tendon is a tough cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones.

What is a fracture?
Fractures are breaks in the bone that are often caused by a blow or a fall. A fracture can range from a simple hairline fracture (a thin fracture that may not run through the entire bone) to a compound fracture, in which the broken bone protrudes through the skin. Most fractures happen in the arms and legs. Stress fractures are weak spots or small cracks in the bone caused by continuous overuse. Stress fractures often happen in the foot or leg after training for gymnastics, running, and other sports. The bones in the midfoot (metatarsals) in runners are especially vulnerable to stress fractures.

What is a dislocation?
A dislocation happens when extreme force is put on a ligament, allowing the ends of two connected bones to separate. Stress on joint ligaments can lead to dislocation of the joint.

Rehabilitation of Sports Injuries:
A rehabilitation program for sports injuries is designed to meet the needs of the individual patient, depending on the type and severity of the injury. Active involvement of the patient and family is vital to the success of the program. The goal of rehabilitation after an amputation is to help the patient return to the highest level of function and independence possible, while improving the overall quality of life--physically, emotionally, and socially. Rehabilitation programs for sports injuries are usually conducted on an outpatient basis. 
Many skilled professionals are part of the sports injury rehabilitation team, including any or all of the following:

  • Orthopedist/Orthopedic Surgeon
  • Physical Therapist/Physical Therapist Assistant
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Certified Athletic Trainer
  • Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist